Name of the speaker: Brent Little
Position: Professor

Company/Organization: State Key Laboratory for Transient Optics and Photonics, Xian Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, CAS, Xian, China
CTO, QXP Technologies Inc., Xian, China

Nationality:USA

 



The Title of Speech: Micro and Nano Fabrication Techniques for VLSI Photonics

 Biography of the Speaker: Brent Little received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Math from the University of Waterloo, Canada in 1994. He was a post-doc at MIT for two years followed by research faculty jointly at both MIT and the University of Maryland between 1996 and 2000. In 2000 he was the founder and CTO of a photonics company, Little Optics Inc near Washington DC, which pioneered high-index photonics for miniaturization of optical components. Dr. Little has also served as Vice President of Photonics at Nomadics, Inc, Director of PLC design at Infinera, and Visiting Scientist at Fujitsu Labs in Japan. Currently he is a visiting professor at the Xian Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS in Xian, China, as well as the co-founder and CTO of QXP Technologies Inc, a photonics technology company in Xian China.

Abstract of Speech:Photonic circuits are becoming increasingly important in applications such as telecommunications, sensing, high speed computation, and other fields. The high carrier frequency of light waves allows for high information bandwidth and high sensitivity which can not be achieved by electronics technologies. On the other hand, the containment and manipulation of photons is much more difficult than that of electrons. In this talk we summarize technologies for photonic circuits. In particular we explore various material and fabrication techniques that are allowing photonic circuits to become smaller and smaller, similar in principle to the evolution seen by microelectronics over the past five decades. Photonics is now on a path towards VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration), and fabrication techniques require precision down to the few tens of nanometer’s scale.